Get Outside, It's Spring Quarter


OUR WEATHER IS beautiful. All the swarming Pro-Fros know it, and we do, too. Sometimes, though, getting outside is extraordinarily difficult for the students of this sunny campus. It’s sometimes harder than you think to take advantage of the outdoors, even while living on the nation’s largest campus.

We’ve put together a couple of ideas for when the sky is blue and you can’t afford to procrastinate but choose to, anyway.


The Matadero Creek Trail

For a change of scenery if you’re sick of The Dish, try to motivate yourself to traverse what is known as the S-1. Finished several years after, apparently, a bit of a war, this trail is part of a public easement, and is a mile and a half long. Though paved and not necessarily a wilderness hike, the Matadero trail will reward you with (on a clear day) views of the City, the Bay Bridge, and both Mt. Diablo and Mt. Hamilton.

Stats: Length is 1.5 miles long
Paved/gravel surface
Begins at Page Mill and Foothill
Only 280 feet of elevation change


Beaches near the Peninsula

Some weekends, beach cravings get overwhelming, and if you have access to a car, these options are each a half-hour off of campus.

Half Moon Bay

A gorgeous swath of beach nestled next to a quiet town, Half Moon Bay is popular and can get busy over the weekends. It is a classic Northern California beach and winds or the tide might mean that you end up wearing a sweatshirt instead of a bikini.

San Gregorio Beach

Absolutely lovely, with a cave and sandstone cliffs that seem to drip into the ocean, San Gregorio is arguably the closest pretty beach, and though Fall brings driftwood and other debris, Spring keeps the beaches (usually) clear. It’s been known to be a family beach and can get trashed, so do you part and pack out your trash to keep it beautiful.

Without a car? Santa Cruz is probably your best bet! Definitely a beach town, you can also hit up the Boardwalk while you’re there. Take a south-bound Caltrain to the end of the line at San Jose, then hop on the Highway 17 Express to the Santa Cruz Metro Station. About an hour and a half journey, you’re dropped in downtown Santa Cruz, but an Uber can take you to one of many local beaches.


An hour outside, between classes or P-Sets

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If you’re not looking to commit days here, and just need a bit of air after a stifling lecture, outside yoga or a class might appeal. Depending on the day, Stanford Aerobics and Yoga offers different yoga and aerobics classes. While you can buy quarterly and annual passes, a drop-in pass is $6 and can be a welcome breather. For some stretching before you get locked into morning class, try Outdoor Yoga on the Oval every Tuesday at 8:15.

Check out more classes here.


Keeping your life exciting

To rack up those college experiences and take advantage of the opportunities our ever-useful student IDs afford us, think about signing up for one of the Outdoor Education Adventure Trips offered by Stanford Outdoor Education! They run anywhere between $30-200, but include everything that you’d need, and the trips can take you to local hot springs or teach you how to windsurf. Some trips are reserved for seniors or other groups, but most are open to even the plebs , so see if an upcoming trip looks interesting, and check in often so that you don’t miss a dope trip.

Click here for more details.


Soak up the sun while keeping your skin happy and healthy

We all know that sunscreen is important—even under clouds or when it’s a bit brisk. For many of us, the allure of bronzed, toasted skin may be too much to resist. For the future-aware among us, Neutrogena makes inexpensive and non-irritating sunscreen to keep you from getting roasted under the sun’s harsh UV rays.

If you’re attached to the look of a tan (and you already know this), look into sunless tanners, including the one of the hour: James Read Sleep Mask Tan. You’re supposed to slather it onto your face before bed and wake up with a bit of a glow. Net-A-Porter tells us this. It’s just under $45, but everyone knows that beauty is worth your inheritance.

By: Eleni Spanos